Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found! #genealogy #citydirectories #ancestors
Genealogy Research,  How To

How to Use City Directories In Your Genealogy Research

Are city directories a part of your genealogy toolbox?

It was bound to happen.

You exhausted the more traditional genealogy records (census records, vital records, deeds….) for your ancestor and you still need more information.

At a recent conference you attended, someone recommended you search for your ancestor(s) in the city directories.  

What is the city directory and why would you use one in your genealogy research?

When I first heard of using city directories in my genealogy research, I immediately thought of phone books. Yes, phone books are directories, but relatively new in the evolution of city directories.

City directories have been around for a long time with the first ones in the U.S. were published within a couple of years after the American Revolution. Directories were initially created by craftsmen and salesmen to contact the local residents and potential customers.

Directories evolved and were often created yearly which allows the genealogy researcher  to track an ancestor year by year as opposed to the census records tracking individuals decade by decade.  Tracking an ancestor year by year can help you determine when he/she migrated out of an area or if their economic situation improved based on a change of neighborhoods.

The directories also included different types of information from the census records.

Types of Information Found In City Directories

Based on date and location, the type of information in a city directory will vary.  Below are examples of types of information potentially found in a city directory.

  • Names
    • Wives names may be listed in parentheses
  • Addresses
  • Occupation
  • Marital status (If widowed, the name of the husband)
  • Businesses
  • Officers and Leadership of Organizations 
    • Firemen
    • Lunatic Asylum
    • Educational Institutions
    • Secret and Benevolent Societies
      Explore city directories for your ancestors! City directories are valuable research tools as you work to break down those genealogy brick walls.
      1859 Columbia, SC City Directory (Source: Ancestry.com)
  • Area maps
  • Addresses and locations of schools and places of worship.

I think you are starting to see just how valuable city directories can be in your research, so let’s take a closer look.

The 1837 Salem, MA directory tells just what it has to offer on its title page:  Name of the inhabitants; Occupation, Businesses and Residences; City officers, etc; Street & Wharves and (my favorite) “Other useful information”.

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found! #genealogy #citydirectories #ancestors

“Other  Useful Information” can include maps…..

Explore city directories for your ancestors! City directories are valuable research tools as you work to break down those genealogy brick walls.
1837 Salem, MA City Directory (Source: Google Books)

Newspapers….. A listing of the local newspapers can potentially be found and especially useful to the genealogy researcher. In this example from the The Salem Directory, 5 newspapers were in existence and provide 5 potential sources to conduct newspaper research into your ancestors.

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found!
“Other Useful Information” in the Salem Directory (Source: Google Books)

And Local Societies…… Notice the Female Auxiliary Moral Society in the example below.  Yes, city directories can be a source for those elusive female ancestors!

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found!
Local Societies of Salem, MA in 1837 (Source: Google Books)

Now let’s take a look at following an individual through city census records and see what we can learn about him and his family. In this example,  we are following Israel Lisson through  the Rochester, New York city directories. In this exert from the 1896 Rochester, NY directory, Israel Lisson is listed, so we as researchers can place him in time (1896) and place (Rochester, NY).  Israel’s occupation is listed as a pedler [peddler]  and he lives at 38 Nassau. We can literally place him on the map in 1896.

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found! #genealogy #citydirectories #ancestors

Coming forward a few years, in 1915 Israel Lisson in still in the Rochester directory.

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found! #genealogy #citydirectories #ancestors

This time we see Israel is still a pedler [peddler] and is living at 81 Chatham.  Again, he is placed in time and place.  Notice the other Lisson family members listed.  From other genealogy records we know all but Barnet are Israel’s adult children. [I’m still trying to figure out how Barnet Lisson is related to family!] 

This final directory example (below) I am sharing with you is from the 1930 Rochester directory.  By this time, Israel is dead, but note his widow Dora is listed. This directory entry can be used to narrow down a death date.

On another note, notice the other Lisson family members listed.  The married males’ wives are listed in parentheses.  Directories can be a source for finding an ancestor’s spouse!

Using City Directories is an important genealogy research strategy for finding brick wall ancestors. Many free online directories can be found! #genealogy #citydirectories #ancestors

5 Steps to Analyze That City Directory

Now it’s your turn. You have found the city directory for where your ancestors lived.   How do you get the most out of that valuable resource?

  1. Make note of the location(s) included in the directory. Sometimes smaller rural communities may be included in the next larger town’s directory. 

      2. Examine the Table of Contents. What types of information and lists are included? Included information will vary greatly over  time and locations.

Explore city directories for your ancestors! City directories are valuable research tools as you work to break down those genealogy brick walls.
1859 Columbia, SC City Directory Table of Contents. (Source: Ancestry.com)

     3. Learn the abbreviations used in the directory. 

     4. Start searching for your ancestor(s). As with any record, check multiple spellings for the name. I usually start with the general population listing, then move on to the societies, businesses or other organization lists.

    5. Check the “Additions” or “Late Entries”. Usually found at the beginning or the end of the directory are those late additions that just made it in time for publication. Don’t miss out on finding your ancestor there.

Explore city directories for your ancestors! City directories are valuable research tools as you work to break down those genealogy brick walls.
Additions to the 1859 Columbia, SC Directory. (Source: Ancestry.com)

 

Where To Find City Directories

Now that I have convinced you of the value of researching city directories, let’s find them! As with other records, what is available will vary  by state and time period. Check out these sources.

Your Action Item For the Week

Explore what city directories exist for the locations where your ancestors lived. Start searching!

***Please note that this post contains affiliate links which means I may earn a commission if you decide to purchase a product/service. This does not cost you extra. Be assured I only recommend products/services that I use and think you would like too. Read my disclosure policy and privacy policy.

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Explore city directories for your ancestors! City directories are valuable research tools as you work to break down those genealogy brick walls.

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